Reference: Mason PB and Struhl K (2005) Distinction and relationship between elongation rate and processivity of RNA polymerase II in vivo. Mol Cell 17(6):831-40

Reference Help

Abstract


A number of proteins and drugs have been implicated in the process of transcriptional elongation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, but the factors that govern the elongation rate (nucleotide additions per min) and processivity (nucleotide additions per initiation event) in vivo are poorly understood. Here, we show that a mutation in the Rpb2 subunit of Pol II reduces both the elongation rate and processivity in vivo. In contrast, none of the putative elongation factors tested affect the elongation rate, although mutations in the THO complex and in Spt4 significantly reduce processivity. The drugs 6-azauracil and mycophenolic acid reduce both the elongation rate and processivity, and this processivity defect is aggravated by mutations in Spt4, TFIIS, and CTDK-1. Our results suggest that, in vivo, a reduced rate of Pol II elongation leads to premature dissociation along the chromatin template and that Pol II processivity can be uncoupled from elongation rate.

Reference Type
Comparative Study | Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Mason PB, Struhl K
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Evidence Method Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Disease Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Disease Ontology Term Qualifier Evidence Method Source Assigned On Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Direction Regulation Of Happens During Method Evidence