Reference: Broomfield S, et al. (2001) DNA postreplication repair and mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutat Res 486(3):167-84

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Abstract


DNA postreplication repair (PRR) is defined as an activity to convert DNA damage-induced single-stranded gaps into large molecular weight DNA without actually removing the replication-blocking lesions. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, this activity requires RecA and the RecA-mediated SOS response and is accomplished by recombination and mutagenic translesion DNA synthesis. Eukaryotic cells appear to share similar DNA damage tolerance pathways; however, some enzymes required for PRR in eukaryotes are rather different from those of prokaryotes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PRR is centrally controlled by RAD6 and RAD18, whose products form a stable complex with single-stranded DNA-binding, ATPase and ubiquitin-conjugating activities. PRR can be further divided into translesion DNA synthesis and error-free modes, the exact molecular events of which are largely unknown. This error-free PRR is analogous to DNA damage-avoidance as defined in mammalian cells, which relies on recombination processes. Two possible mechanisms by which recombination participate in PRR to resolve the stalled replication folk are discussed. Recombination and PRR are also genetically regulated by a DNA helicase and are coupled to the cell-cycle. The PRR processes appear to be highly conserved within eukaryotes, from yeast to human.

Reference Type
Comparative Study | Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Review
Authors
Broomfield S, Hryciw T, Xiao W
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