Reference: Ast T, et al. (2013) A network of cytosolic factors targets SRP-independent proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Cell 152(5):1134-45

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Abstract


Translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an initial and crucial biogenesis step for all secreted and endomembrane proteins in eukaryotes. ER insertion can take place through the well-characterized signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent pathway or the less-studied route of SRP-independent translocation. To better understand the prevalence of the SRP-independent pathway, we systematically defined the translocational dependence of the yeast secretome. By combining hydropathy-based analysis and microscopy, we uncovered that a previously unappreciated fraction of the yeast secretome translocates without the aid of the SRP. Furthermore, we validated a family of SRP-independent substrates-the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Studying this family, we identified a determinant for ER targeting and uncovered a network of cytosolic proteins that facilitate SRP-independent targeting and translocation. These findings highlight the underappreciated complexity of SRP-independent translocation, which enables this pathway to efficiently cope with its extensive substrate flux.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Ast T, Cohen G, Schuldiner M
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