Reference: Abeliovich H and Gonzalez R (2009) Autophagy in food biotechnology. Autophagy 5(7):925-9

Reference Help

Abstract


The purpose of this review is not to explain autophagy (as clearly there is a plethora of reviews and research papers on the topic) but to provide the autophagy-savvy reader with an overview of the impact of autophagy research on a number of current topics in food biotechnology. To understand this connection, we need to remember that autophagy is, at the end of the day, a type of stress response. Since as humans we are heterotrophic eukaryotic organisms, our cells, and the cells of those organisms that we consume, use autophagy as part of the day-to-day business of living. Thus, a number of food biotechnology processes such as brewing and winemaking employ eukaryotic organisms under autophagy-inducing conditions, as noted below. In addition, food spoilage processes also involve eukaryotic organisms and these processes also involve physiological aspects that impinge on autophagy. Finally, the recently introduced concept of "functional foods" introduces the possibility of engineering foodstuff for the induction or inhibition of autophagy in the consumer, with a potential promise of health benefits that merits further research. In this review, we will provide a perspective on the current literature in these three areas, their relationship to current basic research in autophagy, and their future applicative potential.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Review
Authors
Abeliovich H, Gonzalez R
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Qualifier Gene Ontology Term Aspect Annotation Extension Evidence Method Source Assigned On Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Disease Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Disease Ontology Term Qualifier Evidence Method Source Assigned On Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Direction Regulation Of Happens During Method Evidence

Post-translational Modifications


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through its pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Site Modification Modifier Reference

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference