Reference: Torres NP, et al. (2013) A high-throughput yeast assay identifies synergistic drug combinations. Assay Drug Dev Technol 11(5):299-307

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Abstract


Abstract Drug combinations are commonly used in the treatment of a range of diseases such as cancer, AIDS, and bacterial infections. Such combinations are less likely to be thwarted by resistance, and they have the desirable potential to be synergistic. Synergistic combinations can have decreased toxicity if lower doses of the constituent agents can be used. Conversely, antagonistic combinations can lead to lower efficacy of a treatment. Unfortunately, practical limitations, including the large number of possible combinations to be tested and the importance of optimizing concentrations and order of addition, discourage systematic studies of compound combinations. To address these limitations, we present a platform to screen drug combinations at multiple concentrations with varying orders of addition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at high throughput. In a proof of principle, we screened all possible pairwise combinations of 11 DNA damaging agents and found that of the 66 combinations tested, six were synergistic and three were antagonistic. The strength of two-thirds of these combinations was dependent on the order in which the drugs were added to the cells. We further tested the synergistic and antagonistic combinations in two cancer cell lines and found the combination of mitomycin C and irinotecan to be synergistic in both cell lines. This pilot study demonstrates the utility of using yeast for screening large matrices of drug combinations, and it provides a means to prioritize drug combination tests in human cells. Finally, we underscore the importance of testing the order of addition for assessing drug combinations.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Torres NP, Lee AY, Giaever G, Nislow C, Brown GW
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