Take our Survey

Reference: Alhebshi A, et al. (2012) The essential iron-sulfur protein Rli1 is an important target accounting for inhibition of cell growth by reactive oxygen species. Mol Biol Cell 23(18):3582-90

Reference Help

Abstract


Oxidative stress mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is linked to degenerative conditions in humans and damage to an array of cellular components. However, it is unclear which molecular target(s) may be the primary "Achilles' heel" of organisms, accounting for the inhibitory action of ROS. Rli1p (ABCE1) is an essential and highly conserved protein of eukaryotes and archaea that requires notoriously ROS-labile cofactors (Fe-S clusters) for its functions in protein synthesis. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ROS toxicity is caused by Rli1p dysfunction. In addition to being essential, Rli1p activity (in nuclear ribosomal-subunit export) was shown to be impaired by mild oxidative stress in yeast. Furthermore, prooxidant resistance was decreased by RLI1 repression and increased by RLI1 overexpression. This Rlip1 dependency was abolished during anaerobicity and accentuated in cells expressing a FeS cluster-defective Rli1p construct. The protein's FeS clusters appeared ROS labile during in vitro incubations, but less so in vivo. Instead, it was primarily (55)FeS-cluster supply to Rli1p that was defective in prooxidant-exposed cells. The data indicate that, owing to its essential nature but dependency on ROS-labile FeS clusters, Rli1p function is a primary target of ROS action. Such insight could help inform new approaches for combating oxidative stress-related disease.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Alhebshi A, Sideri TC, Holland SL, Avery SV
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference