Take our Survey

Reference: Orozco H, et al. (2012) Wine yeast sirtuins and Gcn5p control aging and metabolism in a natural growth medium. Mech Ageing Dev 133(5):348-358

Reference Help

Abstract

Grape juice fermentation by wine yeast is an interesting model to understand aging under conditions closer to those in nature. Grape juice is rich in sugars and, unlike laboratory conditions, the limiting factor for yeast growth is nitrogen. We tested the effect of deleting sirtuins and several acetyltransferases to find that the role of many of these proteins during grape juice fermentation is the opposite to that under standard laboratory aging conditions using synthetic complete media. For instance, SIR2 deletion extends maximum chronological lifespan in wine yeasts grown under laboratory conditions, but shortens it in winemaking. Deletions of sirtuin HST2 and acetyltransferase GCN5 have the opposite effect to SIR2 mutation in both media. Acetic acid, a well known pro-aging compound in laboratory conditions, does not play a determinant role on aging during wine fermentation. We discovered that gcn5Delta mutant strain displays strongly increased aldehyde dehydrogenase Ald6p activity, caused by blocking of Ald6p degradation by autophagy under nitrogen limitation conditions, leading to acetic acid accumulation. We describe how nitrogen limitation and TOR inhibition extend the chronological lifespan under winemaking conditions and how the TOR-dependent control of aging partially depends on the Gcn5p function.CI - Copyright (c) 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Orozco H, Matallana E, Aranda A
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference