Reference: Beaufort S, et al. (2012) Fluorescent proteins as in-vivo and in-situ reporters to study the development of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast biofilm and its invasion by the bacteria Escherichia coli. FEMS Microbiol Ecol 80(2):342-51

Reference Help

Abstract


This work deals with the bacterial contamination of yeast, both as biofilm and in the planktonic phase. A model continuous system using self-fluorescent microorganisms was proposed to perform in vivo and in situ studies of a mixed biofilm. The yeast strain was inoculated first while the bacteria were added few days later to mimic a contamination. Supports sampled during the experiment were observed by scanning confocal laser microscopy. The behaviour of the microorganisms in real process conditions was then analysed without any treatment that could modify their physiology and/or damage the community structure. Using image analysis, the characteristics of biofilm development (microorganism ratio, 3D-organisation, growth rates) were studied and compared to the behaviour of the suspended cells in the bioreactor. Based on the biovolumes (volume occupied by each microorganism), the growth rates in biofilm for the bacteria and the yeasts were determined at 0.10 and 0.03 h(-1) respectively, while the imposed dilution rate was 0.10 h(-1). Even though the ability of yeast to develop biofilm was demonstrated, its capacity remained very low compared to that of the bacteria which quickly invaded and covered the whole yeast biofilm. This approach makes an original and powerful tool to study the competition phenomena occurring in model biofilms.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Beaufort S, Da Silva T, Lafforgue C, Alfenore S
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference