Take our Survey

Reference: Pir P, et al. (2012) The genetic control of growth rate: a systems biology study in yeast. BMC Syst Biol 6(1):4

Reference Help

Abstract


ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Control of growth rate is mediated by tight regulation mechanisms in all free-living organisms since long-term survival depends on adaptation to diverse environmental conditions. The yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, when growing under nutrient-limited conditions, controls its growth rate via both nutrient-specific and nutrient-independent gene sets. At slow growth rates, at least, it has been found that the expression of the genes that exert significant control over growth rate (high flux control or HFC genes) is not necessarily regulated by growth rate itself. It has not been determined whether the set of HFC genes is the same at all growth rates or whether it is the same in conditions of nutrient limitation or excess. RESULTS: HFC genes were identified in competition experiments in which a population of hemizygous diploid yeast deletants were grown at, or close to, the maximum specific growth rate in either nutrient-limiting or nutrient-sufficient conditions. A hemizygous mutant is one in which one of any pair of homologous genes is deleted in a diploid, These HFC genes divided into two classes: a haploinsufficient (HI) set, where the hemizygous mutants grow slower than the wild type, and a haploproficient (HP) set, which comprises hemizygotes that grow faster than the wild type. The HI set was found to be enriched for genes involved in the processes of gene expression, while the HP set was enriched for genes concerned with the cell cycle and genome integrity. CONCLUSION: A subset of growth-regulated genes have HFC characteristics when grown in conditions where there are few, or no, external constraints on the rate of growth that cells may attain. This subset is enriched for genes that participate in the processes of gene expression, itself (i.e. transcription and translation). The fact that haploproficiency is exhibited by mutants grown at the previously determined maximum rate implies that the control of growth rate in this simple eukaryote represents a trade-off between the selective advantages of rapid growth and the need to maintain the integrity of the genome.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Pir P, Gutteridge A, Wu J, Rash B, Kell DB, Zhang N, Oliver SG
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference