Reference: Valentine SJ, et al. (2011) Using ion mobility data to improve peptide identification: intrinsic amino acid size parameters. J Proteome Res 10(5):2318-29

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Abstract


A new method for enhancing peptide ion identification in proteomics analyses using ion mobility data is presented. Ideally, direct comparisons of experimental drift times (t(D)) with a standard mobility database could be used to rank candidate peptide sequence assignments. Such a database would represent only a fraction of sequences in protein databases and significant difficulties associated with the verification of data for constituent peptide ions would exist. A method that employs intrinsic amino acid size parameters to obtain ion mobility predictions that can be used to rank candidate peptide ion assignments is proposed. Intrinsic amino acid size parameters have been determined for doubly charged peptide ions from an annotated yeast proteome. Predictions of ion mobilities using the intrinsic size parameters are more accurate than those obtained from a polynomial fit to t(D) versus molecular weight data. More than a 2-fold improvement in prediction accuracy has been observed for a group of arginine-terminated peptide ions 12 residues in length. The use of this predictive enhancement as a means to aid peptide ion identification is discussed, and a simple peptide ion scoring scheme is presented.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Valentine SJ, Ewing MA, Dilger JM, Glover MS, Geromanos SJ, Hughes C, Clemmer DE
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