Reference: Qiu ZR, et al. (2011) An essential role for trimethylguanosine RNA caps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae meiosis and their requirement for splicing of SAE3 and PCH2 meiotic pre-mRNAs. Nucleic Acids Res 39(13):5633-46

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Abstract


Tgs1 is the enzyme that converts m(7)G RNA caps to the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) caps characteristic of spliceosomal snRNAs. Fungi grow vegetatively without TMG caps, thereby raising the question of what cellular transactions, if any, are TMG cap-dependent. Here, we report that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tgs1 methyltransferase activity is essential for meiosis. tgs1? cells are specifically defective in splicing PCH2 and SAE3 meiotic pre-mRNAs. The TMG requirement for SAE3 splicing is alleviated by two intron mutations: a UAUUAAC to UACUAAC change that restores a consensus branchpoint and disruption of a stem-loop encompassing the branchpoint. The TMG requirement for PCH2 splicing is alleviated by a CACUAAC to UACUAAC change restoring a consensus branchpoint and by shortening the PCH2 5' exon. Placing the SAE3 and PCH2 introns within a HIS3 reporter confers Tgs1-dependent histidine prototrophy, signifying that the respective introns are portable determinants of TMG-dependent gene expression. Analysis of in vitro splicing in extracts of TGS1 versus tgs1? cells showed that SAE3 intron removal was enfeebled without TMG caps, whereas splicing of ACT1 was unaffected. Our findings illuminate a new mode of tunable splicing, a reliance on TMG caps for an essential developmental RNA transaction, and three genetically distinct meiotic splicing regulons in budding yeast.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Qiu ZR, Shuman S, Schwer B
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