Reference: Yamada J, et al. (2010) A bimodal distribution of two distinct categories of intrinsically disordered structures with separate functions in FG nucleoporins. Mol Cell Proteomics 9(10):2205-24

Reference Help

Abstract


Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) gate the only conduits for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Their gate is formed by nucleoporins containing large intrinsically disordered domains with multiple phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG domains). In combination, these are hypothesized to form a structurally and chemically homogeneous network of random coils at the NPC center, which sorts macromolecules by size and hydrophobicity. Instead, we found that FG domains are structurally and chemically heterogeneous. They adopt distinct categories of intrinsically disordered structures in non-random distributions. Some adopt globular, collapsed coil configurations and are characterized by a low charge content. Others are highly charged and adopt more dynamic, extended coil conformations. Interestingly, several FG nucleoporins feature both types of structures in a bimodal distribution along their polypeptide chain. This distribution functionally correlates with the attractive or repulsive character of their interactions with collapsed coil FG domains displaying cohesion toward one another and extended coil FG domains displaying repulsion. Topologically, these bipartite FG domains may resemble sticky molten globules connected to the tip of relaxed or extended coils. Within the NPC, the crowding of FG nucleoporins and the segregation of their disordered structures based on their topology, dimensions, and cohesive character could force the FG domains to form a tubular gate structure or transporter at the NPC center featuring two separate zones of traffic with distinct physicochemical properties.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Yamada J, Phillips JL, Patel S, Goldfien G, Calestagne-Morelli A, Huang H, Reza R, Acheson J, Krishnan VV, Newsam S, ... Show all
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference