Reference: Chiu J, et al. (2011) Cell Cycle Sensing of Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Oxidation of a Specific Cysteine Residue in the Transcription Factor Swi6p. J Biol Chem 286(7):5204-14

Reference Help

Abstract


Yeast cells begin to bud and enter S phase when growth conditions are favourable during G1 phase. When subjected to some oxidative stresses, cells delay entry at G1 allowing repair of cellular damage. Hence, oxidative stress sensing is coordinated with the regulation of cell cycle. We identified a novel function of the cell-cycle regulator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Swi6p, as a redox sensor through its cysteine residue at position 404. When alanine was substituted at this position, the resultant mutant, C404A, was sensitive to several reactive oxygen species and oxidants including linoleic acid hydroperoxide, the superoxide anion and diamide. This mutant lost the ability to arrest in G1 phase upon treatment with lipid hydroperoxide. The Cys404 residue of Swi6p in wild-type cells was oxidised to a sulfenic acid when cells were subjected to linoleic acid hydroperoxide. Mutation of Cys404 to Ala abolished the down-regulation of expression of the G1 cyclin genes CLN1, CLN2, PCL1 and PCL2 that occurred when cells of the wild type were exposed to the lipid hydroperoxide. In conclusion, oxidative stress signaling for cell-cycle regulation occurs through oxidation of the G1/S-speicific transcription factor Swi6p and consequently leads to suppression of the expression of G1-cyclins and delay in cells entering the cell cycle.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Chiu J, Tactacan CM, Tan SX, Lin RC, Wouters MA, Dawes IW
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference