Take our Survey

Reference: Margeot A, et al. (2005) Why are many mRNAs translated to the vicinity of mitochondria: a role in protein complex assembly? Gene 354:64-71

Reference Help

Abstract

The longstanding question of the presence of mitochondria-bound polysomes has been recently revisited using new approaches. Genome-wide analyses provided evidence that many genes are actually translated on mitochondria-bound polysomes and GFP-labeling techniques have shown that, in vivo, the 3'UTR sequence of these genes contains signals which can target hybrid RNA molecules to the proximity of mitochondria. Evolutionary conservation of some of these signals will be presented. Interestingly, class I mRNA which are translated on free polysomes and class II mRNA which are translated on mitochondria-bound polysomes have, mostly, eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins respectively. Using ATP2, a typical prokaryotic-derived gene, as a model for class II mRNA, we showed that its 3'UTR sequence is essential both for a correct addressing of mRNA to mitochondria proximity and to a proper production of functional ATP synthases. These different observations suggest that prokaryotic-derived genes are, like the contemporary mitochondrial genes, translated near mitochondrial membranes. In both cases this locus specific translation process might be connected to a correct complex assembly program and the cases of ATP synthase and cytochrome c oxidase complexes will be considered in this respect.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Margeot A, Garcia M, Wang W, Tetaud E, di Rago JP, Jacq C
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference