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Reference: Wu B, et al. (2010) Novel channel enzyme fusion proteins confer arsenate resistance. J Biol Chem 285(51):40081-7

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Abstract

Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H2AsVO4-/HAsVO42-) to arsenite (AsIII(OH)3) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB/ACR3 arsenite transporters. Here we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single-gene encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar selectively lowering glycerol but not arsenite permeability. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a non-functional channel may use an alternative, actinobacteria-specific cofactor, such as mycothiol. These channel-enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Wu B, Song J, Beitz E
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