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Reference: Ataian Y and Krebs JE (2006) Five repair pathways in one context: chromatin modification during DNA repair. Biochem Cell Biol 84(4):490-504

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Abstract

The eukaryotic cell is faced with more than 10 000 various kinds of DNA lesions per day. Failure to repair such lesions can lead to mutations, genomic instability, or cell death. Therefore, cells have developed 5 major repair pathways in which different kinds of DNA damage can be detected and repaired: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and mismatch repair. However, the efficient repair of DNA damage is complicated by the fact that the genomic DNA is packaged through histone and nonhistone proteins into chromatin, a highly condensed structure that hinders DNA accessibility and its subsequent repair. Therefore, the cellular repair machinery has to circumvent this natural barrier to gain access to the damaged site in a timely manner. Repair of DNA lesions in the context of chromatin occurs with the assistance of ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzymes and histone-modifying enzymes, which allow access of the necessary repair factors to the lesion. Here we review recent studies that elucidate the interplay between chromatin modifiers / remodelers and the major DNA repair pathways.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Review | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Authors
Ataian Y, Krebs JE
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