Reference: Lopez-Mirabal HR and Winther JR (2007) The thiol oxidant dipyridyl disulfide can supply the PDI-Ero1p pathway with additional oxidative equivalents. Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek 92(4):463-72

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Abstract

Membrane-permeant oxidants have become a standard tool for studying eukaryotic organisms because they affect the redox state and the redox regulation of different compartments. The ero1-1 mutant is temperature sensitive (37 degrees C) and cannot grow under anaerobic conditions. Low micromolar concentrations of the specific thiol-oxidant dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) rescue both these growth defects. Furthermore, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is slightly induced by a DPS treatment. We infer that DPS may change the redox state of important ER-proteins by GSH-oxidation in the ER or, more likely, by directly oxidizing these targets. Therefore, DPS may be useful in genetic studies dealing with unknown factors of the Ero1p-driven pathway. The ero1-1 mutation and the overproduction of Ero1p confer DPS-sensitivity that could be partially related to a more oxidized cytosolic GSH redox potential and the presence of reactive oxidative species (ROS) in the cell.

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Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Lopez-Mirabal HR, Winther JR
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