Take our Survey

Reference: Matia-Gonzalez AM and Rodriguez-Gabriel MA (2011) Slt2 MAPK pathway is essential for cell integrity in the presence of arsenate. Yeast 28(1):9-17

Reference Help

Abstract


Arsenate is a common toxic metalloid found in drinking water worldwide that causes several human diseases. The biochemical action underlying cellular response to arsenate, however, is not yet completely understood. Here we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an eukaryotic model system to identify proteins essential for adaptation to arsenate treatment. Previous studies have demonstrated a function for Hog1 MAPK in modulating the cellular response to arsenite. Our results, however, showed that cells deficient in Hog1 did not show increased sensitivity to arsenate, suggesting that perhaps other MAPKs may be involved in the response to this particular arsenic species. Here, we found that Slt2 MAPK and several of its upstream regulators are essential in modulating the response to arsenate, and that Slt2 is phosphorylated after arsenate treatment. Furthermore, whole-genome transcriptional analysis showed that Slt2 is required for the induction of several genes in response to arsenate exposure. Many of these genes are involved in the cellular response to heat, suggesting an overlap between these two stress response pathways, and pointing toward a common response to both arsenate and heat exposure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, our results support the idea that cellular exposure to arsenate results in induction of cellular signalling pathways different from those induced under arsenite treatment. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Matia-Gonzalez AM, Rodriguez-Gabriel MA
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference