Reference: Bartoszewska M and Kiel JA (2011) The role of macroautophagy in development of filamentous fungi. Antioxid Redox Signal 14(11):2271-87

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Abstract


Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a bulk degradative pathway by which cytoplasmic components are delivered to the vacuole for recycling. This process is conserved from yeast to human, where it is implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. During the last decade, many ATG genes involved in autophagy have been identified, initially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of autophagy using yeast as model system. Although many of the core components involved in autophagy are conserved from yeast to human, there are, nevertheless, significant differences between these organisms, for example, during autophagy initiation. Autophagy also plays an essential role in filamentous fungi especially during differentiation. Remarkably, in these species autophagy may reflect features of both yeast and mammals. This is exemplified by the finding that filamentous fungi lack the S. cerevisiae clade-specific Atg31 protein, but contain Atg101, which is absent in this clade. A reappraisal of genome data further suggests that, similar to yeast and mammals, filamentous fungi probably also contain two distinct phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complexes. This review also summarizes the state of knowledge on the role of autophagy in filamentous fungi during differentiation, such as pathogenic development, programmed cell death during heteroincompatibility, and spore formation.

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Journal Article
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Bartoszewska M, Kiel JA
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