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Reference: Al Safadi R, et al. (2010) A polyploid population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with separate sexes (dioecy). FEMS Yeast Res 10(6):757-68

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Abstract


Abstract Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an interesting model for studies of evolution, with whole-genome duplication shown to have played an important role in the evolution of this species. This phenomenon depends on the formation of a transient stable polyploid state. Previous studies have reported polyploidy to be an unstable state in yeast, but here, we describe a polyploid population of S. cerevisiae. The evolution of higher eukaryotes has also involved the development of different systems of sexual reproduction, the choice between self-fertilization and out-crossing becoming a key issue. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a hermaphrodite eukaryote, despite the theoretical genetic disadvantages of this strategy, in which self-fertilization occurs. We describe, for the first time, a near-dioecious (with separate sexes) population in this species. Mating type and the MAT locus display complex segregations. Essentially, each strain produces, by meiosis, spores of only one mating type: mata or matalpha. Moreover, strains are heterothallic, and diploid nonmating clones generated from a single spore do not sporulate. These three properties limit self-fertilization and strongly favour out-crossing. We suggest that the shift in sexual strategy, from hermaphroditism to dioecy, is specific to the brewing process, which overcomes the sexual isolation probably found in natural biotopes.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Al Safadi R, Weiss-Gayet M, Briolay J, Aigle M
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