Reference: Carotenuto W and Liberi G (2010) Mitotic inter-homologue junctions accumulate at damaged DNA replication forks in recQ mutants. DNA Repair (Amst) 9(6):661-9

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Abstract

Mitotic homologous recombination is utilised to repair DNA breaks using either sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes as templates. Because sister chromatids are identical, exchanges between sister chromatids have no consequences for the maintenance of genomic integrity unless they involve repetitive DNA sequences. Conversely, homologous chromosomes might differ in genetic content, and exchanges between homologues might lead to loss of heterozygosity and subsequent inactivation of functional genes. Genomic instability, caused by unscheduled recombination events between homologous chromosomes, is enhanced in the absence of RecQ DNA helicases, as observed in Bloom's cancer-prone syndrome. Here, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyse budding yeast diploid cells that were modified to distinguish replication intermediates originating from each homologous chromosome. Therefore, these cells were suitable for analysing the formation of inter-homologue junctions. We found that Rad51-dependent DNA structures resembling inter-homologue junctions accumulate together with sister chromatid junctions at damaged DNA replication forks in recQ mutants, but not in the absence of Srs2 or Mph1 DNA recombination helicases. Inter-homologue joint molecules in recQ mutants are less abundant than sister chromatid junctions, but they accumulate with similar kinetics after origin firing under conditions of DNA damage. We propose that unscheduled accumulation of inter-homologue junctions during DNA replication might account for allelic recombination defects in recQ mutants.CI - Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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Journal Article
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Carotenuto W, Liberi G
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