Reference: Rivera-Molina FE and Novick PJ (2009) A Rab GAP cascade defines the boundary between two Rab GTPases on the secretory pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106(34):14408-13

Reference Help

Abstract


Membrane traffic along the endocytic and exocytic pathways relies on the appropriate localization and activation of a series of different Rab GTPases. Rabs are activated by specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and inactivated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). GEF cascades, in which one Rab in its GTP-bound form recruits the GEF that activates the next Rab along the pathway, can account for the sequential activation of a series of Rabs, but it does not explain how the first Rab is inactivated after the next Rab has been activated. We present evidence for a counter-current GAP cascade that serves to restrict the spatial and temporal overlap of 2 Rabs, Ypt1p and Ypt32p, on the exocytic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that Gyp1p, a GAP for Ypt1p, specifically interacts with Ypt32p, and that this interaction is important for the localization and stability of Gyp1p. Moreover, we demonstrate that, in WT cells, Ypt1p compartments are converted over time into Ypt32p compartments, whereas in gyp1Delta cells there is a significant increase in compartments containing both proteins that reflects a slower transition from Ypt1p to Ypt32p. GEF cascades working in concert with counter-current GAP cascades could generate a programmed series of Rab conversions responsible for regulating the choreography of membrane traffic.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Rivera-Molina FE, Novick PJ
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference