Reference: Ruiz JF, et al. (2009) Chromosomal translocations caused by either pol32-dependent or pol32-independent triparental break-induced replication. Mol Cell Biol 29(20):5441-54

Reference Help

Abstract


Double strand breaks (DSBs) are harmful DNA lesions that can generate chromosomal rearrangements or chromosome losses if not properly repaired. Despite their association with a number of genetic diseases and cancer, the mechanisms by which DSBs cause rearrangements remain unknown. Using a newly developed experimental assay for the analysis of translocations occurring between two chromosomes in S. cerevisiae, we found that a single DSB located on one chromosome uses a short homologous sequence found in a third chromosome as a bridge to complete DSB repair, leading to chromosomal translocations. Such translocations are dramatically reduced when the short homologous sequence on the third chromosome is deleted. Translocations rely on Homologous Recombination (HR) proteins, such as Rad51, Rad52 and Rad59, as well as on the Break Induced Replication (BIR)-specific protein Pol32 and Srs2, but not on Ku70. Our results indicate that a single chromosomal DSB efficiently searches for short homologous sequences throughout the genome for its repair, leading to triparental translocations between heterologous chromosomes. Given the abundance of repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes, this study opens the possibility that HR rather than Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) may be a major source for chromosomal translocations.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Ruiz JF, Gomez-Gonzalez B, Aguilera A
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference