Reference: Lu SP, et al. (2009) Assimilation of Endogenous Nicotinamide Riboside Is Essential for Calorie Restriction-mediated Life Span Extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J Biol Chem 284(25):17110-9

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Abstract


NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is an essential cofactor involved in various biological processes including calorie restriction (CR)-mediated life span extension. Administration of NmR (nicotinamide riboside) has been shown to ameliorate deficiencies related to aberrant NAD+ metabolism in both yeast and mammalian cells. However, the biological role of endogenous NmR remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that salvaging endogenous NmR is an integral part of NAD+ metabolism. A balanced NmR salvage cycle is essential for CR-induced life span extension and stress resistance in yeast. Our results also suggest that partitioning of the pyridine nucleotide flux between the classical salvage cycle and the NmR salvage branch might be modulated by the NAD+-dependent Sir2 deacetylase. Furthermore, two novel deamidation steps leading to NaMN (nicotinic acid mononucleotide) and NaR (nicotinic acid riboside) production are also uncovered, which further underscore the complexity and flexibility of NAD+ metabolism. In addition, utilization of extracellular NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide) requires prior conversion to NmR mediated by a periplasmic phosphatase Pho5. Conversion to NmR may thus represent a strategy for the transport and assimilation of large non-permeable NAD+ precursors. Together, our studies provide a molecular basis for how NAD+ homeostasis factors confer metabolic flexibility.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Lu SP, Kato M, Lin SJ
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