Take our Survey

Reference: Tuller T, et al. (2009) Higher-order genomic organization of cellular functions in yeast. J Comput Biol 16(2):303-16

Reference Help

Abstract


Previous studies have shown that the distribution of genes in prokaryotes and eukaryotic genomes is not random. Using the thousands of cellular functions that appear in the Gene Ontology (GO) project, we exhaustively studied the relation between functionality and genomic localization of genes across 16 organisms with rich GO ontologies (one prokaryote and 15 eukaryotes). Overall, we found that the genomic distribution of cellular functions tends to be more similar in organisms that have higher evolutionary proximity. At the primary level, which measures localization of functionally related genes, the prokaryote Escherichia coli exhibits the highest level of organization, as one would expect given its operon-based genomic organization. However, examining a higher level of genomic organization by analyzing the co-localization of pairs of different functional gene groups, we surprisingly find that the eukaryote yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is markedly more organized than E. coli. A network-based analysis further supports this notion and suggests that the eukaryotic genomic architecture is more organized than previously thought. See online Supplementary Material at (www.liebertonline.com).

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Tuller T, Rubinstein U, Bar D, Gurevitch M, Ruppin E, Kupiec M
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference