Reference: Thorpe PH, et al. (2008) Modeling stem cell asymmetry in yeast. Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 73:81-8

Reference Help

Abstract


For adult stem cells to both self-renew and give rise to differentiating progenitors, they must undergo an inherently asymmetric division. This defining model of asymmetric cell division requires either that stem cells preferentially distribute internal factors, thereby maintaining a stem cell phenotype in one lineage, or that extrinsic signals determine the fate of daughter cells, allowing the maintenance of one stem cell lineage. Although microbial systems are often used to model asymmetry, lineage-specific asymmetry has not been characterized in these organisms. Recently, we identified a stem-cell-like lineage-specific pattern of kinetochore asymmetry in postmeiotic yeast spores. Because the function of the kinetochore is to segregate chromosomes, this asymmetry has the potential to segregate sister chromatids nonrandomly. This may be relevant to stem cells because more than 30 years ago, it was proposed that stem cells selectively segregate one strand of their chromosomes into the self-renewing stem cell lineage (Cairns 1975). Although advanced labeling methods have provided evidence to both support and refute this hypothesis, it remains unclear how nonrandom sister-chromatid segregation might be achieved in a stem cell lineage. We have identified a kinetochore-specific mechanism in yeast that could support lineage-specific nonrandom sister-chromatid segregation and we discuss the implications of this observation.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Thorpe PH, Bruno J, Rothstein R
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference