Reference: Musso G, et al. (2008) The extensive and condition-dependent nature of epistasis among whole-genome duplicates in yeast. Genome Res 18(7):1092-9

Reference Help

Abstract


Since complete redundancy between extant duplicates (paralogs) is evolutionarily unfavorable, some degree of functional congruency is eventually lost. However, in budding yeast, experimental evidence collected for duplicated metabolic enzymes and in global physical interaction surveys had suggested widespread functional overlap between paralogs. While maintained functional overlap is thought to confer robustness against genetic mutation and facilitate environmental adaptability, it has yet to be determined what properties define paralogs that can compensate for the phenotypic consequence of deleting a sister gene, how extensive this epistasis is, and how adaptable it is towards alternate environmental states. To this end, we have performed a comprehensive experimental analysis of epistasis as indicated by aggravating genetic interactions between paralogs resulting from an ancient Whole-Genome Duplication (WGD) event occurring in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae, and thus were able to compare properties of large numbers of epistatic and non-epistatic paralogs with identical evolutionary times since divergence. We found that over one-third (140) of the 399 examinable WGD paralog pairs were epistatic under standard laboratory conditions, and that additional cases of epistasis became obvious only under media conditions designed to induce cellular stress. Despite a significant increase in within-species sequence co-conservation, analysis of protein interactions revealed that paralogs epistatic under standard laboratory conditions were not more functionally overlapping than those non-epistatic. As experimental condition impacted the functional categorization of paralogs deemed epistatic, and only a fraction of potential stress conditions have been interrogated here, we hypothesize that many epistatic relationships remain unresolved.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Musso G, Costanzo M, Huangfu M, Smith AM, Paw J, San Luis BJ, Boone C, Giaever G, Nislow C, Emili A, ... Show all
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference