Take our Survey

Reference: Li YF and Bao WG (2007) Why do some yeast species require niacin for growth? Different modes of NAD synthesis. FEMS Yeast Res 7(5):657-64

Reference Help

Abstract

NAD holds a key position in metabolism and cellular regulatory events as a major redox carrier and a signalling molecule. NAD biosynthesis pathways have been reconstructed and compared in seven yeast species with completely sequenced genomes, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis, Candida glabrata, Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida albicans, Yarrowia lipolytica and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Both amino acid and nucleotide sequence similarity analysis in silico indicated that de novo NAD biosynthesis might not exist in K. lactis, C. glabrata and Schiz. pombe, while other species have the kynurenine pathway. It also showed that the NAD salvage pathway via nicotinic acid and nicotinic acid mononucleotide is conserved in all of these yeasts. Deletion of KlNPT1 (the gene for nicotinate phosphoribosyl-transferase) is lethal, which demonstrates that this salvage pathway, utilizing exogenous nicotinic acid, is the unique route to synthesize NAD in K. lactis. The results suggested that the basis of the variation of niacin requirements in yeasts lies in their different combinations of NAD biosynthesis pathways. The de novo pathway is absent but the salvage pathway is conserved in niacin-negative yeasts, while both pathways coexist in niacin-positive yeasts.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Li YF, Bao WG
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference