Reference: Malkowski MG, et al. (2007) Blocking S-adenosylmethionine synthesis in yeast allows selenomethionine incorporation and multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104(16):6678-83

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Abstract

Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal host from which to obtain high levels of posttranslationally modified eukaryotic proteins for x-ray crystallography. However, extensive replacement of methionine by selenomethionine for anomalous dispersion phasing has proven intractable in yeast. We report a general method to incorporate selenomethionine into proteins expressed in yeast based on manipulation of the appropriate metabolic pathways. sam1(-) sam2(-) mutants, in which the conversion of methionine to S-adenosylmethionine is blocked, exhibit reduced selenomethionine toxicity compared with wild-type yeast, increased production of protein during growth in selenomethionine, and efficient replacement of methionine by selenomethionine, based on quantitative mass spectrometry and x-ray crystallography. The structure of yeast tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase was solved to 1.8 A by using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing with protein that was expressed and purified from the sam1(-) sam2(-) strain grown in selenomethionine. Six of eight selenium residues were located in the structure.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Authors
Malkowski MG, Quartley E, Friedman AE, Babulski J, Kon Y, Wolfley J, Said M, Luft JR, Phizicky EM, Detitta GT, ... Show all
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