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Reference: Morey NJ, et al. (2003) Delineating the requirements for spontaneous DNA damage resistance pathways in genome maintenance and viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetics 164(2):443-55

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Abstract


Cellular metabolic processes constantly generate reactive species that damage DNA. To counteract this relentless assault, cells have developed multiple pathways to resist damage. The base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways remove damage whereas the recombination (REC) and postreplication repair (PRR) pathways bypass the damage, allowing deferred removal. Genetic studies in yeast indicate that these pathways can process a common spontaneous lesion(s), with mutational inactivation of any pathway increasing the burden on the remaining pathways. In this study, we examine the consequences of simultaneously compromising three or more of these pathways. Although the presence of a functional BER pathway alone is able to support haploid growth, retention of the NER, REC, or PRR pathway alone is not, indicating that BER is the key damage resistance pathway in yeast and may be responsible for the removal of the majority of either spontaneous DNA damage or specifically those lesions that are potentially lethal. In the diploid state, functional BER, NER, or REC alone can support growth, while PRR alone is insufficient for growth. In diploids, the presence of PRR alone may confer a lethal mutation load or, alternatively, PRR alone may be insufficient to deal with potentially lethal, replication-blocking lesions.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Morey NJ, Doetsch PW, Jinks-Robertson S
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