Reference: Shim EY, et al. (2007) RSC mobilizes nucleosomes to improve accessibility of repair machinery to the damaged chromatin. Mol Cell Biol 27(5):1602-13

Reference Help

Abstract


Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) protects cells and organisms, as well as their genome integrity. Since DSB repair occurs in the context of chromatin, chromatin must be modified to prevent it from inhibiting DSB repair. Evidence supports the role of histone modifications and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in repair and signaling of chromosome DSBs. The key questions are, then, what the nature of chromatin altered by DSBs is and how remodeling of chromatin facilitates DSB repair. Here we report a chromatin alteration caused by a single HO endonuclease-generated DSB at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MAT locus. The break induces rapid nucleosome migration to form histone-free DNA of a few hundred base pairs immediately adjacent to the break. The DSB-induced nucleosome repositioning appears independent of end processing, since it still occurs when the 5'-to-3' degradation of the DNA end is markedly reduced. The tetracycline-controlled depletion of Sth1, the ATPase of RSC, or deletion of RSC2 severely reduces chromatin remodeling and loading of Mre11 and Yku proteins at the DSB. Depletion of Sth1 also reduces phosphorylation of H2A, processing, and joining of DSBs. We propose that RSC-mediated chromatin remodeling at the DSB prepares chromatin to allow repair machinery to access the break and is vital for efficient DSB repair.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Shim EY, Hong SJ, Oum JH, Yanez Y, Zhang Y, Lee SE
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference