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Reference: Niu H, et al. (2005) Partner choice during meiosis is regulated by Hop1-promoted dimerization of Mek1. Mol Biol Cell 16(12):5804-18

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Abstract

Meiotic recombination differs from mitotic recombination in that DSBs are repaired using homologous chromosomes, rather than sister chromatids. This change in partner choice is due in part to a barrier to sister chromatid repair (BSCR) created by the meiosis-specific kinase, Mek1, in a complex with two other meiosis-specific proteins, Hop1 and Red1. HOP1 contains two functional domains, called the N and C domains. Analysis of a point mutation that specifically inactivates the C domain (hop1-K593A) reveals that the N domain is sufficient for Hop1 localization to chromosomes and for Red1 and Hop1 interactions. The C domain is needed for spore viability, for chromosome synapsis, and for preventing DMC1-independent DSB repair, indicating it plays a role in the BSCR. All of the hop1-K593A phenotypes can be bypassed by fusion of ectopic dimerization domains to Mek1, suggesting that the function of the C domain is to promote Mek1 dimerization. Hop1 is a DSB-dependent phosphoprotein, whose phosphorylation requires the presence of the C domain, but is independent of MEK1. These results suggest a model in which Hop1 phosphorylation in response to DSBs triggers dimerization of Mek1 via the Hop1 C domain, thereby enabling Mek1 to phosphorylate target proteins that prevent repair of DSBs by sister chromatids.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Authors
Niu H, Wan L, Baumgartner B, Schaefer D, Loidl J, Hollingsworth NM
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