Take our Survey

Reference: Schneider J, et al. (2006) Rtt109 is required for proper H3K56 acetylation: a chromatin mark associated with the elongating RNA polymerase II. J Biol Chem 281(49):37270-4

Reference Help

Abstract


Histone acetylation has been shown to be required for the proper regulation of many cellular processes including transcription, DNA repair, and chromatin assembly. Acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56 (H3K56) occurs both during the premeiotic and mitotic S phase, and persists throughout DNA damage repair. To learn more about the molecular mechanism of H3K56 acetylation and factors required for this process, we surveyed the genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes necessary for this process. A comparative global proteomic screen identified several factors required for global H3K56 acetylation, which included histone chaperone Asf1 and a protein of an unknown function Rtt109, but not Spt10. Our results indicate that the loss of Rtt109 results in the loss of H3K56 acetylation, both on bulk histone and on chromatin, similar to that of asf1 or the K56Q mutation. RTT109 deletion exhibits sensitivity to DNA damaging agents similar to that of asf1 and H3K56Q mutants. Furthermore, Rtt109 and H3K56 acetylation appear to correlate with actively transcribed genes and associate with the elongating form of Pol II in yeast. This histone modification is also associated with some of the transcriptionally active puff sites in Drosophila. Our results indicate a new role for the Rtt109 protein in the proper regulation of H3K56 acetylation.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Schneider J, Bajwa P, Johnson FC, Bhaumik SR, Shilatifard A
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference