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Reference: Sengupta N, et al. (2007) Crosstalk between cAMP-PKA and MAP kinase pathways is a key regulatory design necessary to regulate FLO11 expression. Biophys Chem 125(1):59-71

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Abstract

Signal transduction pathways crosstalk with one another and play a central role in regulation of cellular events. Crosstalk brings complexity to the system, and hence, a systematic analysis of these crosstalks helps in relating the signaling network structure to its function. Here, we present a modular steady state approach to quantify the network comprising of cAMP-PKA and MAP kinase pathways involved in the regulation of FLO11, a gene which is required for pseudohyphae growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under nitrogen starvation. These two pathways crosstalk by converging on the same target, i.e., FLO11 and through Ras2p, an upstream activator of both cAMP and MAPK pathway. Analysis of crosstalk at the gene level revealed that cAMP-PKA and MAPK pathways are indispensable to FLO11 expression. The dose response was highly sensitive and primarily controlled by cAMP-PKA pathway. We demonstrate that the highly sensitive response in the cAMP-PKA pathway was due to crosstalk and inhibitor ultrsensitivity, key regulatory designs present at the downstream of cAMP-PKA pathway. The analysis of the role of Ras2p in the crosstalk between the cAMP-PKA and MAPK pathways indicated that crosstalk essentially helped in amplification of the Gpa2p signal, another upstream activator of the cAMP-PKA pathway. However, the effect of crosstalk due to Ras2p on FLO11 expression was minimal under normal activation levels of Ras2p. Whereas, the crosstalk itself can bring about FLO11 expression under the hyperactivated Ras2p conditions thereby eliminating the requirement for the other activator Gpa2p. We also observed the presence of system level properties such as amplification, inhibitor ultrasensitvity and bistability, which can be attributed to the regulatory design present in the FLO11 expression system. These system level properties might help the organism to respond to varying nutritional status.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Sengupta N, Vinod PK, Venaktesh KV
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