Take our Survey

Reference: Hildebrandt ER, et al. (2006) Homotetrameric form of Cin8p, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 motor, is essential for its in vivo function. J Biol Chem 281(36):26004-13

Reference Help

Abstract


Kinesin-5 motor proteins are evolutionarily conserved and perform essential roles in mitotic spindle assembly and spindle elongation during anaphase. Previous studies demonstrated a specialized homotetrameric structure with two pairs of catalytic domains, one at each end of a dumbbell shaped molecule. This suggests that they perform their spindle roles by crosslinking and sliding antiparallel spindle microtubules. However, the exact kinesin-5 sequence elements that are important for formation of the tetrameric complexes have not yet been identified. In addition, it has not been demonstrated that the homotetrameric form of these proteins is essential for their biological functions. Thus, we investigated a series of S. cerevisiae Cin8p truncations and internal deletions, in order to identify structural elements in the Cin8p sequence that are required for Cin8p functionality, spindle localization and multimerization. We found that all variants of Cin8p that are functional in vivo form tetrameric complexes. The first coiled-coil domain in Cin8p's stalk, a feature that is shared by all kinesin-5 homologues, is required for its dimerization, and sequences in the last part of the stalk, specifically those likely involved in coiled-coil formation, are required for Cin8p tetramerization. We also found that dimeric forms of Cin8p which are non-functional in vivo can nonetheless bind to microtubules. These findings suggest that binding of microtubules is not sufficient for the functionality of Cin8p and that microtubule crosslinking by the tetrameric complex is essential for Cin8p mitotic functions.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Hildebrandt ER, Gheber L, Kingsbury TJ, Hoyt MA
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference