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Reference: Mahne M, et al. (2006) The Corynebacterium glutamicum gene pmt encoding a glycosyltransferase related to eukaryotic protein-O-mannosyltransferases is essential for glycosylation of the resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf2) and other secreted proteins. FEMS Microbiol Lett 259(2):226-33

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Abstract

Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoassays revealed several proteins of the secretory subproteome of Corynebacterium glutamicum to be glycosylated. By genome-wide searches for genes involved in glycosylation, the C. glutamicum gene cg1014 was found to exhibit significant similarity to eukaryotic protein-O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs) and to a recently identified orthologue of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv1002c, which is responsible for protein-O-mannosylation. The putative membrane protein Cg1014 showed the same predicted transmembrane topology as Saccharomyces cerevisiae PMT1 and M. tuberculosis Rv1002c along with conserved amino acid residues responsible for catalytic activity. Deletion of the C. glutamicum pmt gene (cg1014) caused a complete loss of glycosylation of secreted proteins including the resuscitation promoting factor 2 (Rpf2), which is involved in intercellular communication and growth stimulation of C. glutamicum. Because the gene pmt as well as rpf genes are present in the genomes of all actinobacteria sequenced so far, this work provides new insights into bacterial protein glycosylation and new opportunities to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of Rpf activity in pathogenic growth and infection.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Mahne M, Tauch A, Puhler A, Kalinowski J
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