Reference: Pirner HM and Stolz J (2006) Biotin sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a conserved DNA element and requires the activity of biotin-protein ligase. J Biol Chem 281(18):12381-9

Reference Help

Abstract


Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a prosthetic group in carboxylation reactions. In addition to its role as a cofactor, biotin has multiple roles in gene regulation. We analyzed biotin effects on gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrated by microarray, Northern, and Western analyses that all yeast genes encoding proteins involved in biotin metabolism are up-regulated following biotin depletion. Many of these genes contain a palindromic promoter element that is necessary and sufficient for mediating the biotin response and functions as an upstream-activating sequence. Mutants lacking the plasma membrane biotin transporter Vht1p display constitutively high expression levels of biotin-responsive genes. However, they react normally to biotin precursors that do not require Vht1p for uptake. The biotin-like effect of precursors with regard to gene expression requires their intracellular conversion to biotin. This demonstrates that Vht1p does not act as a sensor for biotin and that intracellular biotin is crucial for gene expression. Mutants with defects in biotin-protein ligase, similar to vht1delta mutants, also display aberrantly high expression of biotin-responsive genes. Like vht1delta cells, they have reduced levels of protein biotinylation, but unlike vht1delta mutants, they possess normal levels of free intracellular biotin. This indicates that free intracellular biotin is irrelevant for gene regulation and identifies biotin-protein ligase as an important element of the biotin-sensing pathway in yeast.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Pirner HM, Stolz J
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference