Reference: Pfander B, et al. (2005) SUMO-modified PCNA recruits Srs2 to prevent recombination during S phase. Nature 436(7049):428-33

Reference Help

Abstract


Damaged DNA, if not repaired before replication, can lead to replication fork stalling and genomic instability; however, cells can switch to different damage bypass modes that permit replication across lesions. Two main bypasses are controlled by ubiquitin modification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a homotrimeric DNA-encircling protein that functions as a polymerase processivity factor and regulator of replication-linked functions. Upon DNA damage, PCNA is modified at the conserved lysine residue 164 by either mono-ubiquitin or a lysine-63-linked multi-ubiquitin chain, which induce error-prone or error-free replication bypasses of the lesions. In S phase, even in the absence of exogenous DNA damage, yeast PCNA can be alternatively modified by the small ubiquitin-related modifier protein SUMO; however the consequences of this remain controversial. Here we show by genetic analysis that SUMO-modified PCNA functionally cooperates with Srs2, a helicase that blocks recombinational repair by disrupting Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments. Moreover, Srs2 displays a preference for interacting directly with the SUMO-modified form of PCNA, owing to a specific binding site in its carboxy-terminal tail. Our finding suggests a model in which SUMO-modified PCNA recruits Srs2 in S phase in order to prevent unwanted recombination events of replicating chromosomes.

Reference Type
Authors
Pfander B, Moldovan GL, Sacher M, Hoege C, Jentsch S
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference