Take our Survey

Reference: Rattray AJ (2004) A method for cloning and sequencing long palindromic DNA junctions. Nucleic Acids Res 32(19):e155

Reference Help

Abstract

DNA sequences containing long adjacent inverted repeats (palindromes) are inherently unstable and are associated with many types of chromosomal rearrangements. The instability associated with palindromic sequences also creates difficulties in their molecular analysis: long palindromes (>250 bp/arm) are highly unstable in Escherichia coli, and cannot be directly PCR amplified or sequenced due to their propensity to form intra-strand hairpins. Here, we show that DNA molecules containing long palindromes (>900 bp/arm) can be transformed and stably maintained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking a functional SAE2 gene. Treatment of the palindrome-containing DNA with sodium bisulfite at high temperature results in deamination of cytosine, converting it to uracil and thus reducing the propensity to form intra-strand hairpins. The bisulfite-treated DNA can then be PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced, allowing determination of the nucleotide sequence of the junctions. Our data demonstrates that long palindromes with either no spacer (perfect) or a 2 bp spacer can be stably maintained, recovered and sequenced from sae2Delta yeast cells. Since DNA sequences from mammalian cells can be gap repaired by their co-transformation into yeast cells with an appropriate vector, the methods described in this manuscript should provide some of the necessary tools to isolate and characterize palindromic junctions from mammalian cells.

Reference Type
Evaluation Studies | Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Rattray AJ
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference