Take our Survey

Reference: Wong CM, et al. (2004) Peroxiredoxin-null yeast cells are hypersensitive to oxidative stress and are genomically unstable. J Biol Chem 279(22):23207-13

Reference Help

Abstract

Peroxiredoxins are a family of abundant peroxidases found in all organisms. Although these antioxidant enzymes are thought to be critically involved in cellular defense and redox signaling, their exact physiological roles are largely unknown. In this study, we took a genetic approach to address the functions of peroxiredoxins in budding yeast. We generated and characterized a yeast mutant lacking all five peroxiredoxins. The quintuple peroxiredoxin-null mutant was still viable, though the growth rate was lower under normal aerobic conditions. Although peroxiredoxins are not essential for cell viability, peroxiredoxin-null yeast cells were more susceptible to oxidative and nitrosative stress. In the complete absence of peroxiredoxins, the expression of other antioxidant proteins including glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase was induced. In addition, the quintuple mutant was hypersensitive to glutathione depletion. Thus, the glutathione system might cooperate with other antioxidant enzymes to compensate for peroxiredoxin deficiency. Interestingly, the peroxiredoxinnull yeast cells displayed an increased rate of spontaneous mutations that conferred resistance to canavanine. This mutator phenotype was rescued by yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p, but not by its active-site mutant defective for peroxidase activity. Our findings suggest that the antioxidant function of peroxiredoxins is important for maintaining genome stability in eukaryotic cells.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Wong CM, Siu KL, Jin DY
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference