Reference: Chow CK and Palecek SP (2004) Enzyme encapsulation in permeabilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Biotechnol Prog 20(2):449-56

Reference Help

Abstract


The Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall provides a semipermeable barrier that can retain intracellular proteins but still permits small molecules to pass through. When S. cerevisiae cells expressing E. coli lacZ are treated with detergent to extract the cell membrane, beta-galactosidase activity in the permeabilized cells is approximately 40% of the activity of the protein in cell extract. However, the permeabilized cells can easily be collected and reused over 15 times without appreciable loss in activity. Cell wall composition and thickness can be modified using different cell strains for enzyme expression or by mutating genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis or degradation. The Sigma1278b strain cell wall is less permeable than the walls of BY4742 and W303 cells, and deleting EXG1, which encodes a 1,3-beta-glucanase, can further reduce permeability. A short Zymolyase treatment can increase cell wall permeability without rupturing the cells. Encapsulating multiple enzymes in permeabilized cells can offer kinetic advantages over the same enzymes in solution. Regeneration of ATP from AMP by adenylate kinase and pyruvate kinase encapsulated in the same cell proceeded more rapidly than regeneration using a cell extract. Combining permeabilized cells containing adenylate kinase with permeabilized cells containing pyruvate kinase can also regenerate ATP from AMP, but the kinetics of this reaction are slower than regeneration using cell extract or permeabilized cells expressing both enzymes.

Reference Type
Journal Article
Authors
Chow CK, Palecek SP
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference