Take our Survey

Reference: Wan L, et al. (2004) Mek1 kinase activity functions downstream of RED1 in the regulation of meiotic double strand break repair in budding yeast. Mol Biol Cell 15(1):11-23

Reference Help

Abstract

Three meiosis-specific chromosomal components in budding yeast, Mek1, Red1, and Hop1, are required for recombination, proper segregation of homologs, and the meiotic recombination checkpoint. Mek1 is a protein kinase. Mutations that increase the size of the ATP binding pocket of Mek1 (mek1-as1) sensitize the kinase to specific small molecule inhibitors. Experiments using mek1-as1 demonstrate that the requirement for Mek1 kinase activity coincides with the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs) and that this activity is necessary after DSB formation to prevent repair by DMC1-independent pathways. Contrary to previous reports, Red1 is not a substrate for Mek1. Instead, RED1 is required for wild-type levels of Mek1 kinase activity. In addition, activation of Mek1 requires HOP1, the formation of Red1/Hop1 complexes and a functional Mek1 FHA domain. The requirement for RED1 to produce active kinase can be bypassed by a mek1 mutation that creates a constitutively active Mek1 kinase. We propose that Red1 is phosphorylated by a kinase other than MEK1 and that phosphothreonines on Red1 then interact with the Mek1 FHA domain to recruit the kinase to sites of DSBs where Mek1 is activated to prevent DMC1-independent DSB repair.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Wan L, de los Santos T, Zhang C, Shokat K, Hollingsworth NM
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference