Take our Survey

Reference: Doe CL and Whitby MC (2004) The involvement of Srs2 in post-replication repair and homologous recombination in fission yeast. Nucleic Acids Res 32(4):1480-91

Reference Help

Abstract


Homologous recombination is important for the repair of double-strand breaks and daughter strand gaps, and also helps restart stalled and collapsed replication forks. However, sometimes recombination is inappropriate and can have deleterious consequences. To temper recombination, cells have employed DNA helicases that unwind joint DNA molecules and/or dissociate recombinases from DNA. Budding yeast Srs2 is one such helicase. It can act by dissociating Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments, and is required for channelling DNA lesions to the post-replication repair (PRR) pathway. Here we have investigated the role of Srs2 in controlling recombination in fission yeast. Similar to budding yeast, deletion of fission yeast srs2 results in hypersensitivity to a range of DNA damaging agents, rhp51-dependent hyper-recombination and synthetic sickness when combined with rqh1- that is suppressed by deleting rhp51, rhp55 or rhp57. Epistasis analysis indicates that Srs2 and the structure-specific endonuclease Mus81-Eme1 function in a sub-pathway of PRR for the tolerance/repair of UV-induced damage. However, unlike in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Srs2 is not required for channelling lesions to the PRR pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In addition to acting as an antirecombinase, we also show that Srs2 can aid the recombinational repair of camptothecin-induced collapsed replication forks, independently of PRR.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Doe CL, Whitby MC
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference