Reference: Schmelzle T, et al. (2004) Activation of the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway suppresses a TOR deficiency in yeast. Mol Cell Biol 24(1):338-51

Reference Help

Abstract

The TOR (target of rapamycin) and RAS/cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways are the two major pathways controlling cell growth in response to nutrients in yeast. In this study we examine the functional interaction between TOR and the RAS/cAMP pathway. First, activation of the RAS/cAMP signaling pathway confers pronounced resistance to rapamycin. Second, constitutive activation of the RAS/cAMP pathway prevents several rapamycin-induced responses, such as the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor MSN2 and induction of stress genes, the accumulation of glycogen, the induction of autophagy, the down-regulation of ribosome biogenesis (ribosomal protein gene transcription and RNA polymerase I and III activity), and the down-regulation of the glucose transporter HXT1. Third, many of these TOR-mediated responses are independent of the previously described TOR effectors TAP42 and the type 2A-related protein phosphatase SIT4. Conversely, TOR-controlled TAP42/SIT4-dependent events are not affected by the RAS/cAMP pathway. Finally, and importantly, TOR controls the subcellular localization of both the protein kinase A catalytic subunit TPK1 and the RAS/cAMP signaling-related kinase YAK1. Our findings suggest that TOR signals through the RAS/cAMP pathway, independently of TAP42/SIT4. Therefore, the RAS/cAMP pathway may be a novel TOR effector branch.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Schmelzle T, Beck T, Martin DE, Hall MN
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference