Reference: Lavoie BD, et al. (2004) In vivo requirements for rDNA chromosome condensation reveal two cell-cycle-regulated pathways for mitotic chromosome folding. Genes Dev 18(1):76-87

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Abstract


Chromosome condensation plays an essential role in the maintenance of genetic integrity. Using genetic, cell biological, and biochemical approaches, we distinguish two cell-cycle-regulated pathways for chromosome condensation in budding yeast. From G(2) to metaphase, we show that the condensation of the approximately 1-Mb rDNA array is a multistep process, and describe condensin-dependent clustering, alignment, and resolution steps in chromosome folding. We functionally define a further postmetaphase chromosome assembly maturation step that is required for the maintenance of chromosome structural integrity during segregation. This late step in condensation requires the conserved mitotic kinase Ipl1/aurora in addition to condensin, but is independent of cohesin. Consistent with this, the late condensation pathway is initiated during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, supports de novo condensation in cohesin mutants, and correlates with the Ipl1/aurora-dependent phosphorylation of condensin. These data provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of higher-order chromosome folding and suggest that two distinct condensation pathways, one involving cohesins and the other Ipl1/aurora, are required to modulate chromosome structure during mitosis.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Lavoie BD, Hogan E, Koshland D
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