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Reference: Grabowska D and Chelstowska A (2003) The ALD6 gene product is indispensable for providing NADPH in yeast cells lacking glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. J Biol Chem 278(16):13984-8

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Abstract


Reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH are essential for many enzymatic steps involved in the biosynthesis of cellular macromolecules. An adequate level of NADPH is also required to protect cells against oxidative stress. The major enzymatic source of NADPH in the cell is the reaction catalyzed by glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway. Disruption of the ZWF1 gene, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, results in methionine auxotrophy and increased sensitivity to oxidizing agents. It is assumed that both phenotypes are due to an NADPH deficiency in the zwf1Delta strain. We used a Met(-) phenotype displayed by the zwf1Delta strain to look for multicopy suppressors of this deletion. We found that overexpression of the ALD6 gene coding for cytosolic acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, which utilizes NADP(+) as its cofactor, restores the Met(+) phenotype of the zwf1Delta strain. Another multicopy suppressor identified in our screen, the ZMS1 gene encoding a putative transcription factor, regulates the level of ALD6 expression. A strain bearing a double ZWF1 ALD6 gene disruption is not viable. Thus, our results indicate the reaction catalyzed by Ald6p as an important source of reducing equivalents in the yeast cells.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Grabowska D, Chelstowska A
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