Take our Survey

Reference: Regelmann J, et al. (2003) Catabolite degradation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a genome-wide screen identifies eight novel GID genes and indicates the existence of two degradation pathways. Mol Biol Cell 14(4):1652-63

Reference Help

Abstract

Metabolic adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from a nonfermentable carbon source to glucose induces selective, rapid breakdown of the gluconeogenetic key enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a process called catabolite degradation. Herein, we identify eight novel GID genes required for proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation of FBPase. Four yeast proteins contain the CTLH domain of unknown function. All of them are Gid proteins. The site of catabolite degradation has been controversial until now. Two FBPase degradation pathways have been described, one dependent on the cytosolic ubiquitin-proteasome machinery, and the other dependent on vacuolar proteolysis. Interestingly, three of the novel Gid proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation have also been reported by others to affect the vacuolar degradation pathway. As shown herein, additional genes suggested to be essential for vacuolar degradation are unnecessary for proteasome-dependent degradation. These data raise the question as to whether two FBPase degradation pathways exist that share components. Detailed characterization of Gid2p demonstrates that it is part of a soluble, cytosolic protein complex of at least 600 kDa. Gid2p is necessary for FBPase ubiquitination. Our studies have not revealed any involvement of vesicular intermediates in proteasome-dependent FBPase degradation. The influence of Ubp14p, a deubiquitinating enzyme, on proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation was further uncovered.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Regelmann J, Schule T, Josupeit FS, Horak J, Rose M, Entian KD, Thumm M, Wolf DH
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations

Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations

Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference