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Reference: Vanrobays E, et al. (2003) Late cytoplasmic maturation of the small ribosomal subunit requires RIO proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Cell Biol 23(6):2083-95

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Abstract

Numerous nonribosomal trans-acting factors involved in pre-rRNA processing have been characterized, but few of them are specifically required for the last cytoplasmic steps of 18S rRNA maturation. We have recently demonstrated that Rrp10p/Rio1p is such a factor. By BLAST analysis, we identified the product of a previously uncharacterized essential gene, YNL207W/RIO2, called Rio2p, that shares 43% sequence similarity with Rrp10p/Rio1p. Rio2p homologues were identified throughout the Archaea and metazoan species. We show that Rio2p is a cytoplasmic-nuclear protein and that its depletion blocks 18S rRNA production, leading to 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. In situ hybridization reveals that in Rio2p-depleted cells, 20S pre-rRNA localizes in the cytoplasm, demonstrating that its accumulation is not due to an export defect. We also show that both Rio1p and Rio2p accumulate in the nucleus of crm1-1 cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Nuclear as well as cytoplasmic Rio2p and Rio1p cosediment with pre-40S particles. These results strongly suggest that Rio2p and Rrp10p/Rio1p are shuttling proteins which associate with pre-40S particles in the nucleus and they are not necessary for export of the pre-40S complexes but are absolutely required for the cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA at site D, leading to mature 40S ribosomal subunits.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't | Comparative Study
Authors
Vanrobays E, Gelugne JP, Gleizes PE, Caizergues-Ferrer M
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