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Reference: Rendina AR, et al. (1984) Use of multiple isotope effects to study the mechanism of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Biochemistry 23(25):6257-62

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Abstract


The multiple isotope effect method of Hermes et al. [Hermes, J. D., Roeske, C. A., O'Leary, M. H., & Cleland, W. W. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 5106-5114] has been used to study the mechanism of the oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase from yeast. 13C kinetic isotope effects of 1.0096 and 1.0081 with unlabeled or 3-deuterated 6-phosphogluconate, plus a 13C equilibrium isotope effect of 0.996 and a deuterium isotope effect on V/K of 1.54, show that the chemical reaction after the substrates have bound is stepwise, with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation. The kinetic mechanism of substrate addition is random at pH 8, since the deuterium isotope effect is the same when either NADP or 6-phosphogluconate or 6-phosphogluconate-3-d is varied at fixed saturating levels of the other substrate. Deuterium isotope effects on V and V/K decrease toward unity at high pH at the same time that V and V/K are decreasing, suggesting that proton removal from the 3-hydroxyl may precede dehydrogenation. Comparison of the tritium effect of 2.05 with the other measured isotope effects gives limits of 3-4 on the intrinsic deuterium and of 1.01-1.05 for the intrinsic 13C isotope effect for C-C bond breakage in the forward direction and suggests that reverse hydride transfer is 1-4 times faster than decarboxylation.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Authors
Rendina AR, Hermes JD, Cleland WW
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