Take our Survey

Reference: Steiner H, et al. (1996) Heme binding to a conserved Cys-Pro-Val motif is crucial for the catalytic function of mitochondrial heme lyases. J Biol Chem 271(51):32605-11

Reference Help

Abstract


Covalent attachment of heme to the apoforms of mitochondrial cytochromes c and c1 requires the activity of cytochrome c heme lyase (CCHL) and cytochrome c1 heme lyase (CC1HL), respectively. The two enzymes differ in their cytochrome specificity, but they are related in sequence, and both contain conserved Cys-Pro-Val (CPV) motifs. By using various in vitro assays we investigated whether heme can bind directly to heme lyases and whether the CPV motif may be involved in heme binding. Heme stabilized CC1HL, as a model protein, in a folded, protease-resistant conformation, stimulated the refolding of CC1HL after urea denaturation, and inhibited the import of the CC1HL precursor into mitochondria. These effects were not observed with a point mutant, CC1HLSPV, in which cysteine was replaced by serine, and with CC1HLDeltaCPV, in which the motif was deleted. These results show that heme lyases can bind heme directly, and they identify the CPV sequence as a structural element important for this interaction. The phenotype of a yeast mutant expressing CC1HLSPV is in good agreement with such a role of the CPV motif. The mutant cells accumulate the heme-free intermediate form of cytochrome c1 and display a severe deficiency in the holo form. We suggest that the CPV motif forms a crucial part of the substrate binding site for heme.

Reference Type
Journal Article | Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Authors
Steiner H, Kispal G, Zollner A, Haid A, Neupert W, Lill R
Primary Lit For
Additional Lit For
Review For

Interaction Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page by using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details about experiment type and any other genes involved in the interaction.

Interactor Interactor Type Assay Annotation Action Modification Phenotype Source Reference

Gene Ontology Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table.

Gene Gene Ontology Term Qualifier Aspect Method Evidence Source Assigned On Annotation Extension Reference

Phenotype Annotations


Increase the total number of rows showing on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; filter the table using the "Filter" box at the top of the table; click on the small "i" buttons located within a cell for an annotation to view further details.

Gene Phenotype Experiment Type Mutant Information Strain Background Chemical Details Reference

Regulation Annotations


Increase the total number of rows displayed on this page using the pull-down located below the table, or use the page scroll at the table's top right to browse through the table's pages; use the arrows to the right of a column header to sort by that column; to filter the table by a specific experiment type, type a keyword into the Filter box (for example, “microarray”); download this table as a .txt file using the Download button or click Analyze to further view and analyze the list of target genes using GO Term Finder, GO Slim Mapper, SPELL, or YeastMine.

Regulator Target Experiment Assay Construct Conditions Strain Background Reference